Aug 10, 2022  
2016-17 Catalog 
    
2016-17 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Reading a Course Description

At the bottom of the course descriptions, students will see a pattern such as 3 credits, plus 1 contact hour = 2 lecture, 2 laboratory, OR 4 credits = 4 lecture/laboratory. The numbers will change based on the individual course. Tuition is charged by the contact hour.

Some course descriptions contain two-letter codes indicating that they meet certain general education competencies. The competencies, along with their codes, are listed below:

Computer Literacy = CL
Critical Thinking = CT
Global Awareness = GA
Government and the Political Process = GP
Mathematics = MA
Oral Communication = OC
Writing = WR

For some courses a prerequisite course or assessment score is required prior to registration. Students who believe that the prerequisite was met through previous college work or work experience may ask the course instructor for permission to waive the prerequisite. It is up to the student to provide the evidence for this waiver request.

Students placing into RD 050 Introduction to College Reading I are required to take the course their first semester. RD 050 is considered a co-requisite to any course in the college catalog.

Prerequisite Waivers

Any course prerequisite may be waived by the permission of the instructor. Student must contact the instructor for approval.

Directed Study

Directed Study is intended as an enrichment opportunity for the student. It is designed for topics not covered in any other course in the catalog and may take the form of a project or research. The interested student may obtain the appropriate form from the instructor or department chair.

Independent Study

Any college course described in the catalog may be taken as independent study if there are unusual and extenuating circumstances. However, the student must initiate acceptance and approval for supervision by an instructor and obtain the appropriate form from the instructor or academic lead.

Selected Topics

All disciplines have a course as follows with the acronym for each discipline − 195 Selected Topics − a course that offers an intensive investigation of one or more topics of current interest. Topics are selected by discipline. Interested students should inform the instructor of their interest at the earliest possible date. Special requirements may be necessary. 1 to 5 credits = 1 to 5 lecture and/or laboratory.

 

Communications Media

  
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    CM 117 - Radio Broadcasting III


    There will be supervised study in the college radio station, WSGR-FM. Students are expected to work in the station a minimum of two hours per week during the semester. The student will learn to operate radio equipment and to produce his or her own radio program for the station. Opportunities to work in news, sports, public service, music and programming will be available. Students may receive credit for each of four semesters. Four semester hours are the maximum amount of credits to be earned at one credit per semester. No previous experience is necessary. The student will work a minimum of 32 hours on air and on related assignments to earn one credit hour. Student may follow the course sequence CM 115  through CM 118 , practicums I through IV.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 118 - Radio Broadcasting IV


    There will be supervised study in the college radio station, WSGR-FM. Students are expected to work in the station a minimum of two hours per week during the semester. The student will learn to operate radio equipment and to produce his or her own radio program for the station. Opportunities to work in news, sports, public service, music and programming will be available. Students may receive credit for each of four semesters. Four semester hours are the maximum amount of credits to be earned at one credit per semester. No previous experience is necessary. The student will work a minimum of 32 hours on air and on related assignments to earn one credit hour. Student may follow the course sequence CM 115  through CM 118 , practicums I through IV.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 200A - Internship in Broadcasting I


    This internship is meant to give students the opportunity to practice skills learned in class in a real work setting. Students who are recommended by a communications instructor make an application to the area of communications business that they are interested in working with. If the business is willing to participate, the student will work either 20 or 40 hours per week for the duration of the semester for either 3 or 6 hours of credit. Offered fall, winter, spring and summer semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    3 credits each = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 200B - Internship in Journalism I


    This internship provides experience for the journalism student at one of our area newspapers. Students are required to work 20 to 40 hours per week for either 3 or 6 hours of credit. Approval must be obtained from the journalism instructor and the newspaper. Offered fall, winter, spring and summer semesters. Special requirements may be necessary; check with instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    3 credits each = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 200C - Internship in Broadcasting II


    This internship is meant to give students the opportunity to practice skills learned in class in a real work setting. Students who are recommended by a communications instructor make an application to the area of communications business that they are interested in working with. If the business is willing to participate, the student will work either 20 or 40 hours per week for the duration of the semester for either 3 or 6 hours of credit. Offered fall, winter, spring and summer semesters.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    3 credits each = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 200D - Internship in Journalism II


    This internship provides experience for the journalism student at one of our area newspapers. Students are required to work 20 to 40 hours per week for either 3 or 6 hours of credit. Approval must be obtained from the journalism instructor and the newspaper. Offered fall, winter, spring and summer semesters. Special requirements may be necessary; check with instructor.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor
    3 credits each = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CM 202 - Advanced News Writing


    This course is a continuation of CM 102  and is intended to provide practice in reporting more complex and specialized stories and to study how news is obtained from the various governmental and community agencies. This course is a once-a-year offering.
    Prerequisite(s): CM 102  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CM 203 - Photojournalism


    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of news photography, including composition, layout, cropping, and general photographic editing for publication. Laboratory exercises include photographic assignments, darkroom techniques and picture essays. This course is a once-a-year offering. Digital camera required.
    Prerequisite(s): CM 103  
    3 credits , plus 2 contact hours = 2 lecture , 3 laboratory
  
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    CM 204 - Advanced Television Workshop


    Students will learn fundamentals of television anchoring, weather and sports casting and street reporting. Students will work on producing cable television programming focusing on St. Clair County. Programs will include County Government Beat, Spotlight on the County Sheriff’s Department, and Today in St. Clair County. Work completed in the semester will be added to each student’s audition tape resumé.
    Prerequisite(s): CM 104  
    3 credits , plus 2 contact hours = 3 lecture , 2 laboratory
  
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    CM 206 - Radio and TV Production Workshop


    News and public affairs programming will be the focus of this course. Students will work on a weekly SCR-TV newscast originating from campus studios in the Wismer Communications Center. The newscast will appear on St. Clair County cable television. Students will work on daily newscasts on the campus FM radio station, WSGR. News programs will include campus news, city and county news, sport, weather and entertainment. Students will gain experience through working with National Public Radio Broadcasts and Public Radio International programming. This course is a once-a-year offering.
    Prerequisite(s): CM 104  
    3 credits , plus 2 contact hours = 3 lecture , 2 laboratory
  
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    CM 208 - Radio/Television Writing


    This course is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge necessary to function as employees in the news or copywriting departments of commercial radio, public radio, or television stations. Students develop writing skills and interviewing techniques that are basic to news department operation, and they develop skills necessary to write and produce radio and television commercials. Laboratory time will be spent writing and assembling copy for WSGR newscasts and for a college-oriented television newscast produced for cable. This course is a once-a-year offering.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101  
    3 credits , plus 1 contact hour = 3 lecture , 1 laboratory
  
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    CM 209 - Introduction to Digital Photography


    This course introduces students to the study of pixel-based photography and the process of creating images and storing images using digital cameras, computer based media or digital media. Artistic, theoretical, ethical and technical aspects of digital photography will also be studied. Other topics to be covered include what to look for when buying a digital camera; the theory, mechanics and art of digital imagery; digital darkrooms; the process of digital photo taking; stitching photos for virtual reality and preparing digital images for print, World Wide Web and other digital media.
    Prerequisite(s): CM 103  and CIS 115 , or permission of instructor
    3 credits , plus 2 contact hours = 2 lecture , 3 laboratory

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 110 - CIS Concepts and Careers


    This course examines the impact of computers on business, society and the individual. Topics include the evolution of computers; the information processing cycle; components of an information system; usage of the computer as an information gathering tool; basic hardware and software terminology and concepts; information system design and development; introduction to programming concepts; introduction to web development concepts; data communications, networking, and the Internet; and exploration of computer-related careers.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 112 - Data Cabling Installation


    This course prepares students to sit for the Electronics Technicians Association’s Data Cabling Installer Certification exam. This exam assesses the ability to correctly design, install and test Category 5 and 6 Network Cable. This course provides the theory and concepts behind cabling standards. It prepares the student to perform the tasks actually required of a cable installer. This course would also be appropriate for those involved in the commercial construction industry as well as computer service and network administration personnel.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    2 credits = 2 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 115 - Microcomputer Applications


    This is a hands-on class using the microcomputer in a variety of applications, including word processing, electronic spreadsheet and database management. The course will emphasize systems as well as applications software. Fundamentals such as identifying computer hardware, file management and problem solving methodologies will be presented.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL
  
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    CIS 120 - Introduction to Networking - Net+ Certification


    This course gives students a broad overview of the networking industry. The course will cover common concepts of the technologies, topologies, protocols and standards that are used in networking. Students who successfully complete this course will be prepared to take the CompTIA Network+ certification, a credential that is often required/requested by employers. In addition, this course will cover the material necessary to pass the CIW Network Technology Associate examination, which is beneficial to students planning a career in web development or web administration. Knowledge and skills acquired from this course will be needed later in the networking program.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 130 - Operating Systems


    This course provides an introduction to current microcomputer operating systems from an end-user perspective. Functions common to all operating systems will be examined. Through lecture and hands-on exercises, students will explore concepts and usage of several different systems such as: MS-DOS, Microsoft Windows™ and Unix.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 150 - Programming Concepts


    This course provides an introduction to general programming topics such as: the program development cycle, data types and control structures, structured programming principles, problem solving, basic algorithms and data validation.
    Prerequisite(s): MTH 102  or BUS 158  
    2 credits = 2 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 160 - A+ Certification


    This is an introductory course on how the computer works at the hardware level. Students will learn the basics of upgrading, maintaining and repairing a computer. Topics include the system board, BIOS, DOS, floppy drives, hard drives, peripheral devices, memory, troubleshooting, supporting Windows and others. This course prepares the student to take the A+ Certification exam.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 200 - Electronic Spreadsheets


    This course focuses on the capabilities, features and usage of electronic spreadsheet software. Particular attention is given to the application of these spreadsheet tools in the solution of practical problems from business, finance, science and other areas. Through lecture and hands-on exercises, students will examine the skills which are needed to make effective use of spreadsheets including: worksheet design, problem organization, use of advanced functions, data manipulation, advanced charts and graphs, spreadsheet automation and presentation of results.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  or OA 157  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 202 - Databases


    This course addresses the design, creation and management of relational databases. Topics covered include database fundamentals, the use of the database management software, the fundamentals of application development and the use of the data management topics such as structured query language (SQL). Emphasis is placed on hands-on use of popular personal computer database software. Students will be expected to design and develop a real-world database application.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  or OA 157  or MTH 110  or MTH 112  or higher or appropriate placement by college assessment
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL CT
  
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    CIS 205 - Internet Development I


    This course provides an introduction to development and management of content for the Internet, specifically the World Wide Web (WWW). Techniques for planning, developing, organizing and maintaining WWW content and sites will be addressed. Through lecture and hands-on exercises, students will explore concepts and usage of HTML, Web-creation and management software, and basic web scripting tools.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  or OA 157  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL
  
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    CIS 206 - Web Foundations Site Development Certification


    This course provides a review of the foundations of website development. This course prepares the student to take the CIW Web Foundations Site Development Associate Certification exam. It is recommended that students take this course the same semester as CIS 205 - Internet Development I .
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CIS 205  
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 212 - Server+ Certification


    This course prepares students to sit for the CompTIA Server+ Certification examination. Server+ Certification validates technical competency and provides a broad awareness of server hardware, software, the physical working environment and disaster recovery concepts. Students will achieve technical competency of server issues and technology, including installation, upgrading, maintenance, and troubleshooting, thus developing skills that are sought by employers. This course is offered based on student demand.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120  or CIS 160  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 213 - Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician


    This course prepares students for an entry-level network certification for the Cisco track. This course covers networking fundamentals, WAN technologies, basic security and wireless concepts, routing and switching fundamentals, and configuring simple networks. A student with a Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) certification will be able to install, operate and troubleshoot a small enterprise branch network, including basic network security. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 221 - Protocol Analysis


    This is an advanced course intended for networking professionals and students who already grasp the general concepts of data communications and networking, but would like to use protocol analysis software to facilitate network design, trouble-shooting and security auditing. This course maps to the objectives for the Wireshark Certified Network Analyst examination. This course is offered based on student demand.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 223  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 222 - LAN Administration


    This course provides students with knowledge and hands-on experience in installation, operation, administration and troubleshooting Microsoft’s Server Operating System. This course covers local area network (LAN) physical media, layer two architectures, structured wiring and network operating systems. The course examines the advantages and disadvantages of common cable infrastructure and provides guidelines for when each is appropriate. Virtual Local Area Networks (VLANs) and various forms of Ethernet technology are explained, such as Fast Ethernet. The curriculum emphasizes quantitative and communications skills as well as providing a foundation in business environments. Students will wire a network (using both copper twisted pair and fiber media), install and configure client computers as well as the server network operating system. The course material will cover much of the information required in specific exams for the Microsoft’s Certified IT Professional (MCITP) certification. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 224 - CCNA Certification


    Building on concepts from prior networking courses, this class prepares students to sit for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification examination.  Students will learn to install, configure, operate and troubleshoot medium size routed and switched networks. Network specialists, network administrators and network support engineers, who maintain small to medium networks, commonly hold the CCNA certification. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 213   and CIS 222 
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 225 - Network Security - Security+ Certification


    This course exposes students to some of the security issues facing today’s networks. The course will also feature a discussion of current events and recent security challenges. The course prepares students to sit for the CompTIA Security+ Certification examination. CompTIA Security+ is an international, vendor-neutral certification that demonstrates competency in network security, compliance, operational security, threats, vulnerabilities, application security, data security, host security, access control and cryptography. CIS 226 Advanced Security builds on the foundation laid by this course. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 226 - Advanced Security -Certified Ethical Hacker


    Building on material from CIS 225 , this course prepares students to conduct penetration tests of corporate networks. Students will be taught not only to identify vulnerabilities, but also how to prevent or minimize them. Numerous labs introduce students to the software that is used to conduct penetration tests and to defend networks against malicious hackers. This course, along with the proper work experience, will prepare students to sit for the EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification. This course is offered based on student demand -specifically in the summer semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 225  and CIS 233  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 227A - Special Topics in Networking


    This course is an in-depth study or one or more current topics in Computer Information Systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 227B - Special Topics in Networking


    This course is an in-depth study or one or more current topics in Computer Information Systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 228A - Special Topics in Cisco Networking


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in networking with Cisco devices and tools. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 228B - Special Topics in Cisco Networking


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in networking with Cisco devices and tools. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 229A - Special Topics in Networking Security


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Networking Security. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 229B - Special Topics in Networking Security


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Networking Security. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 120 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 233 - Linux+ Certification


    This course prepares students to sit for the CompTIA Linux+ (powered by LPI) Certification examination. Linux+ Certification validates technical competency and provides a broad awareness of Linux operating systems. Students will install, configure, use, maintain, administer, and troubleshoot Linux systems. This course will cover a variety of distributions, including Red Hat/Fedora and SUSE. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 130  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 237A - Special Topics in Operating Systems


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in computer operating systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 237B - Special Topics in Operating Systems


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in computer operating systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 239A - Special Topics in Server Administration


    This course is an-depth study of one or more current topics in operating system administration. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 239B - Special Topics in Server Administration


    This course is an-depth study of one or more current topics in operating system administration. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 245 - Intermediate Web Development


    This course focuses on the techniques and technologies needed to develop web pages adaptable to both traditional desktop computers and today’s mobile platforms. Students will further explore HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, building web pages using these foundational technologies. Other topics include: responsive design, mobile apps and search engine optimization (SEO). This course matches objectives for the CIW Advanced HTML5 and CSS3 Specialist Certification. Offered fall semester only
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 205  
    4 credits = 4 lecture/laboratory
    CL
  
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    CIS 247A - Special Topics in Computer Applications


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Information Systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites will be determined by course topic; see online schedule. CIS 200  or CIS 202  or CIS 205 
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 247B - Special Topics in Computer Applications


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Information Systems. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites will be determined by course topic; see online schedule. CIS 200  or CIS 202  or CIS 205  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 252 - Web Client Programming


    This course provides an introduction to technologies and tools used to create dynamic, interactive websites. Client side (browser) technologies will be examined. Programming projects will emphasize the usage of tools such as: JavaScript, AJAX, Flash, Silverlight or other technologies as available. This course matches objectives for the CIW JavaScript Specialist Certification. This course is a once-a-year offering. Offered Winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 205   and CIS 110  or CIS 150  or MTH 113  or appropriate placement by college assessment or ACT score
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL CT
  
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    CIS 254 - Web Server Programming


    This course provides an introduction to technologies and tools used on web servers to create dynamic, data driven web sites. Programming projects will emphasize the usage of tools such as: PHP, MySQL, Python, CGI or other technologies as available. Students will work with the Linux operating system and Apache Web Server.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 205  and CIS 260  or CIS 252  or MTH 113  or appropriate placement by college assessment
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL CT
  
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    CIS 260 - Computer Programming I


    This course provides an introduction to fundamental concepts of computer programming, problem solving techniques and algorithm development. Programming projects will emphasize the syntax and usage of a high level programming language, along with analysis, design and testing. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 110   or CIS 150  or MTH 113  or appropriate placement by college assessment or ACT scores
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CL CT
  
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    CIS 261 - Data Structures Programming


    This course explores the techniques and data structures used in the development of complex software projects. Through lectures and programming projects, this course will cover elementary data structures, dynamic memory allocation, sorting and searching, recursion, algorithmic analysis and object oriented programming techniques. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 260 . NOTE: MTH 113  or higher is strongly recommended.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 267A - Special Topics in Computer Programming


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Information System programming. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 150 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    3 credits = 3 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 267B - Special Topics in Computer Programming


    This course is an in-depth study of one or more current topics in Computer Information System programming. Topics will be selected by the discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 150 ; other prerequisites may apply; see online schedule.
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 282 - Project Management - Project+ Certification


    This course prepares students to sit for the CompTIA Project+ Certification examination. Students will learn the common project management terminology and the technical knowledge and skills required to initiate and develop a project. Students will create scope statements, management plans, statements of work, schedules and other relevant documents. Budgeting and managing project relationships are also covered. Emphasis is placed on finalizing and measuring the success of projects. Real-world examples and case studies will be used throughout the course. Students will use Microsoft Project and Microsoft Visio during this course. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  or OA 157  and MTH 102  or higher or BUS 158  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
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    CIS 286 - Network Analysis and Design


    This capstone course explains the process of analyzing and designing a new network or network upgrade. It presents a step-by-step approach that breaks this complex process into five major phases, each with its own inputs, tasks and outputs: 1). Requirements Gathering, 2). Analysis, 3). Logical Design, 4). Physical Design and 5). Installation and Maintenance. By focusing on user requirements first, students will learn to create an effective solution. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 222   or CIS 225  or CIS 282  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
    CT
  
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    CIS 290A - Computer Co-op/Internship


    This work placement is designed for the Computer Information Systems student who has completed at least all the CIS classes listed in the first and second semesters of one of the three CIS programs.  The work placement may be either a paid (Co-Op) or non-paid (internship) placement.  Students will be individually placed into positions involving operations, programming, networking, web development or systems analysis as fits their needs/desires.  Students may receive credit for up to four CIS 290 courses A, B, C, D at the rate of one credit per course.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status, enrolled in one of the CIS Programs, and approval of the faculty Program Lead for enrolled program
    1 credit (60 hours of placement per credit) = 1 other (Co-Op/Internship)
  
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    CIS 290B - Computer Co-op/Internship


    This work placement is designed for the Computer Information Systems student who has completed at least all the CIS classes listed in the first and second semesters of one of the three CIS programs.  The work placement may be either a paid (Co-Op) or non-paid (internship) placement.  Students will be individually placed into positions involving operations, programming, networking, web development or systems analysis as fits their needs/desires.  Students may receive credit for up to four CIS 290 courses A, B, C, D at the rate of one credit per course.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status, enrolled in one of the CIS Programs, and approval of the faculty Program Lead for enrolled program
    1 credit (60 hours of placement per credit) = 1 other (Co-Op/Internship)
  
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    CIS 290C - Computer Co-op/Internship


    This work placement is designed for the Computer Information Systems student who has completed at least all the CIS classes listed in the first and second semesters of one of the three CIS programs.  The work placement may be either a paid (Co-Op) or non-paid (internship) placement.  Students will be individually placed into positions involving operations, programming, networking, web development or systems analysis as fits their needs/desires.  Students may receive credit for up to four CIS 290 courses A, B, C, D at the rate of one credit per course.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status, enrolled in one of the CIS Programs, and approval of the faculty Program Lead for enrolled program
    1 credit (60 hours of placement per credit) = 1 other (Co-Op/Internship)
  
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    CIS 290D - Computer Co-op/Internship


    This work placement is designed for the Computer Information Systems student who has completed at least all the CIS classes listed in the first and second semesters of one of the three CIS programs.  The work placement may be either a paid (Co-Op) or non-paid (internship) placement.  Students will be individually placed into positions involving operations, programming, networking, web development or systems analysis as fits their needs/desires.  Students may receive credit for up to four CIS 290 courses A, B, C, D at the rate of one credit per course.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status, enrolled in one of the CIS Programs, and approval of the faculty Program Lead for enrolled program
    1 credit (60 hours of placement per credit) = 1 other (Co-Op/Internship)
  
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    CIS 297 - The CIS Professional


    In this capstone course, students will prepare for employment as CIS professionals by developing a current resumé and portfolio, and discussion of issues pertinent to the CIS workplace and employability will be included. Students should not take this course until they are within one year of obtaining their degree. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): CIS 130  and 20 credit hours completed
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    This course is an introduction to the history, philosophy, concepts and problems of law enforcement. A survey is made of the various fields of law enforcement and corrections in the United States. Professional career opportunities are reviewed.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 104 - Delinquency Prevention and Control


    This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the problems of juvenile delinquency. The history of the different concepts of delinquency and the juvenile justice system will be discussed. Juvenile delinquency will be examined in reference to its impact on society and the various theoretical approaches developed to explain its causes. Juvenile court procedures, the police role in dealing with delinquent behavior, and the rights and liabilities of juveniles will be investigated.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 105 - Police Procedures


    This course is designed to provide students with an orientation to patrol procedures. Areas examined are basic patrol operations and techniques to include search and seizure, arrest and civil disorder. Ethical police behavior and interpersonal communication are discussed in relationship to police procedures.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 108 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    This course is an introduction and career orientation into the field of Homeland Security. Topics include the history and principles of Homeland Security, careers in Homeland Security, terrorism, risk management systems, protection of people and business, investigations, computer security, and institutional and infrastructure security systems.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 109 - Introduction to Security Issues


    This course is an introduction and career orientation to the field of security. Topics include the basic principles of public and private security, terrorism, risk management systems, protection of people and business, investigations, computer security, fire prevention and safety, and institutional security systems (industrial, commercial and institutional). Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 119 - The Court Function


    This course is designed to cover arguments over the nature of justice. The course includes a brief history of the development of the Anglo-American legal system; basic tenets of American criminal law and procedure; the organization of courts, the powers, selection, training and professional orientation of key court personnel. This course will describe the steps in the Criminal Justice process from arrest through the appeal; current developments in court technology and administration; and issues related to the discretion of court officials.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 121 - Introduction to Corrections


    This course is designed to introduce students to the historical and philosophical background of the field of corrections and to familiarize them with the legal processes involved: probation, imprisonment and parole. The role of officers and the rights of prisoners will be discussed and community-based corrections described.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 202 - Criminal Law


    This course is a study of substantive law as a means of defining and preserving social order. Sources of criminal law, classification of crimes against persons, property and public welfare; principles of criminal liability, elements necessary to establish crime and criminal intent, specific crimes and defenses, and constitutional limitations are examined.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 206 - Dynamics of Traffic Enforcement


    This course is designed to familiarize the student with proper procedures for traffic control and enforcement. Specifically, the State of Michigan motor vehicle laws and procedures, arrests, citations, alcohol and accident investigation are examined.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 209 - Pressure Point Control Tactics (PPCT)


    This is a basic course that focuses on the use of less-than-lethal defensive tactics. The course includes subject matter dealing with unarmed defensive tactics, control and movement of subjects, control of inmate populations, use of non-lethal weapons and officer survival. The course also includes practical training that is based on methods of both defensive and offensive techniques utilized in the control of violent subjects. Upon successful completion of this program, the student will become a certified “Basic” practitioner of P.P.C.T. (pressure points control tactics) Defensive Tactics, a necessary requirement for the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards certification.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 105  or CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 210 - Dynamics of Substance Abuse


    This course is designed to equip students with up-to-date knowledge concerning the historical and cultural attitudes toward use of alcohol and other drugs, as well as the psychological and physical effects of their use and abuse. Social and political implications of drug abuse and available treatment modalities are also discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  or permission of instructor
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 215 - Basic Criminal Investigation


    This course presents the basic principles of criminal investigation. The course covers the investigative procedures used in handling of crime scene. The procedures discussed include the interviewing and interrogation of persons, the gathering and preserving of evidence and the writing of investigative reports. Also covered in the course are different methods of investigations including conducting surveillances, undercover operations and working with informants. Basic lab techniques and procedures that are integral parts of an investigation are conducted.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 105  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 220 - Specific Offense Investigation


    This course provides students with the techniques of investigating specific offenses to include arson, burglary, narcotic violations, larceny, criminal sexual conduct, robbery and homicide. Laboratory techniques and procedures that are an integral part of forensic science investigations are demonstrated. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  and CJ 105 
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 222 - Client Relations in Corrections


    This course will explore the social and cultural differences that exist between inmates and corrections officers. Factors such as economic status, discrimination and minority membership as well as societal response to these factors will be emphasized. The role of the corrections officer within custodial care settings to deal effectively with inmate relationships will be discussed. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 223 - Correctional Institutions/Facilities


    This course is designed to prepare students for employment in the corrections system. It will explore the function of prisons, various rehabilitation programs, custodial care and prisoner rights. The organization and management of correctional institutions and their safety and security also will be described. Concerns about future developments and problems in the corrections system will be addressed. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 224 - Legal Issues in Corrections


    This course will examine and analyze the roles of the legislature, courts, prosecutors and attorneys in the criminal process. This course will place special emphasis on legal concerns within the corrections system itself. This will include, but not be limited to, the constitutional rights of prisoners and the potential civil liability that correctional facilities and corrections personnel face when those rights are violated. The impact of recent case law decisions and future development resulting from those decisions will be discussed. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 226 - Client Growth and Development in Corrections


    This course is intended for students requiring an understanding of human behavior, psychopathology and treatment interventions, as they relate to the correctional client. This course will emphasize and differentiate between normal and criminal behavior and will define personality, social roles, criminal lifestyles and present biological, psychosocial and sociocultural theories of normal and deviant human behavior. Offered winter semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 228 - Probation and Parole


    This course is designed to prepare students for employment in the Criminal Justice/Corrections field. It will introduce the student to the historical background and development of Probation and Parole from early history to the modern Probation and Parole system. In addition to historical information, students will explore the court system and how an offender progresses through it. Students will learn the sentencing process, starting with the pre-sentence investigation. Sentencing options will be reviewed, sentencing guidelines will be explained, and the rationale for sentencing recommendations made to the court will be studied. The juvenile justice system will be studied with juvenile probation and other available dispositions reviewed. The American probation system, community-based corrections and parole will be studied. Included will be the roles and duties of the modern parole officer. Offered fall semester only.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    CJ 260 - Fundamentals of Terrorism


    This course is designed to provide students with an in depth look at terrorism. The course will examine the history of terrorism, the different forms of terrorism, modern day concerns of terrorism, terrorist organizations and ideologies, weapons and strategies used by terrorists, and future concerns and challenges that terrorists pose. The course will also discuss the strategies developed to contain the terrorist threat including the responsibilities of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 101  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
    GA
  
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    CJ 278 - Field Observations


    CJ 208 (Formerly CJ 208) This course is designed to broaden the educational experiences of the student through observation. The agencies involved in the observations may vary as to the interest of the student.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 105  or CJ 121  
    1 credit = 60 hours of observation plus four clock hours of contact with the field advisor = 1 (other) observation
  
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    CJ 280 - Contemporary Criminal Justice Organizations


    (Formerly CJ 201 and CJ 211). This course is designed to provide students with a basic orientation to government structure and criminal justice organizations that encompass it. It will examine the structure of criminal justice administrations, related human resource issues especially including the selection process, leadership, management theories, organizational structures, ethical dilemmas, civil liabilities, police subculture and behavior, and the future of criminal justice organizations.
    Prerequisite(s): CJ 105  or CJ 121  
    3 credits = 3 lecture

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECE 105 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education


    This course will introduce students to the field of early childhood education and the need for educated early childhood professionals. Emphasis is on the professional aspects of early childhood education and child care, including: historical perspectives; contributions in the field; current practices and trends; understanding the various roles of the early childhood settings and identifying quality components of such. This course will benefit both future and present early childhood professionals. Students are required to observe various early childhood settings/facilities and interview early childhood professionals working in the field.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    ECE 108 - Caring for Infants and Toddlers


    This course will introduce students to the essentials of infant and toddler growth and development and the specialized care giving skills needed to work effectively with the zero to three populations. Emphasis is on developmental milestones; developmentally appropriate practice; standards of quality care; and current theories, research and findings related to infants and toddlers. Students will explore the various domains of development including: physical (fine and gross motor); cognitive; emotional; social; and language, as well as gain an understanding of the “whole” child. This course will benefit early childhood professionals working with infants and toddlers, as well as parents of infants and toddlers. Offered fall semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    ECE 109 - Working with School-Age Children


    This course will introduce students to the care and teaching of school-age children and youth in out-of-school environments, including before-and after-school, holiday and summer programs. Emphasis is on the needs and the development of school-age children; standards of quality care; and best practices. This course will benefit early childhood professionals and others working with school-age children. Students will explore various current issues and conditions that many children face today. Other topics include developmental theories and theorists; programming and administration; activities and curriculum planning; family and community involvement; and program accreditation. Offered winter semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
  •  

    ECE 111 - Music and Movement in Early Childhood


    This course will introduce students to music making and music play within early childhood education. Students will learn the importance of music education during early childhood and how music education is linked to literacy and comprehension. This course will cover basic melody composition, referencing folk songs and other songs we grew up singing. Songs will be accompanied by movement games including marching, skipping, tip-toes, and skating. Along with the lecture portion of this class, students will participate in actual early childhood music classes, working with children ages birth to 5 years. This course will benefit early childhood professionals working with young children, as well as parents of young children.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA renewal of CDA, the Michigan Department of Education Paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    2 credits = 2 lecture
  
  •  

    ECE 200A - Early Childhood Education Practicum


    This course will serve as a description for ECE 200A , ECE 200B , ECE 200C  and ECE 200D . Students will integrate college classroom instruction with on-the-job learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a licensed and instructor-approved child care facility and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the child care facility gaining direct experience working with young children. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. This course must be taken concurrently with ECE 108 , ECE 109 , ECE 204 , ECE 205 , ECE 206  or ECE 211  unless instructor permission is granted. If desired, students may take each credit at a different location to broaden their experience and knowledge for a maximum of four credits total.
    NOTE: *Students may clock hours of experience toward completion of the CDA credential.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  or permission of instructor
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
  •  

    ECE 200B - Early Childhood Education Practicum


    This course will serve as a description for ECE 200A , ECE 200B , ECE 200C  and ECE 200D . Students will integrate college classroom instruction with on-the-job learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a licensed and instructor-approved child care facility and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the child care facility gaining direct experience working with young children. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. This course must be taken concurrently with ECE 108 , ECE 109 , ECE 204 , ECE 205 , ECE 206  or ECE 211   unless instructor permission is granted. If desired, students may take each credit at a different location to broaden their experience and knowledge for a maximum of four credits total.
    NOTE: *Students may clock hours of experience toward completion of the CDA credential.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  or permission of instructor
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    ECE 200C - Early Childhood Education Practicum


    This course will serve as a description for ECE 200A , ECE 200B , ECE 200C  and ECE 200D . Students will integrate college classroom instruction with on-the-job learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a licensed and instructor-approved child care facility and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the child care facility gaining direct experience working with young children. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. This course must be taken concurrently with ECE 108 , ECE 109 , ECE 204 , ECE 205 , ECE 206  or ECE 211   unless instructor permission is granted. If desired, students may take each credit at a different location to broaden their experience and knowledge for a maximum of four credits total.
    NOTE: *Students may clock hours of experience toward completion of the CDA credential.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  or permission of instructor
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    ECE 200D - Early Childhood Education Practicum


    This course will serve as a description for ECE 200A , ECE 200B , ECE 200C  and ECE 200D . Students will integrate college classroom instruction with on-the-job learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a licensed and instructor-approved child care facility and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the child care facility gaining direct experience working with young children. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. This course must be taken concurrently with ECE 108 , ECE 109 , ECE 204 , ECE 205 , ECE 206  or ECE 211   unless instructor permission is granted. If desired, students may take each credit at a different location to broaden their experience and knowledge for a maximum of four credits total.
    NOTE: *Students may clock hours of experience toward completion of the CDA credential.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  or permission of instructor
    1 credit = 1 lecture /laboratory
  
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    ECE 204 - Health, Safety & Nutrition for Young Children


    This course will provide a comprehensive examination of the critical issues related to children’s health, safety and nutrition, and the development of practical strategies for creating safe and healthy environments for young children. Emphasis is on the importance of the role early childhood professionals play in promoting good health and life-long healthy attitudes and practices for young children. This course will benefit early childhood professionals currently working with young children, those new to the field, as well as parents of young children. Topics include: SIDS, FAS/FAE; HIV/AIDS; child abuse and neglect; health appraisals and assessment tools; allergies; communicable and acute illnesses (identification and management); management of accidents and injuries; basic concepts of food, nutrition and menu planning; and the educational importance of indoor and outdoor physical activities and experiences for children. Offered fall semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    ECE 205 - Supportive Learning Environments for Young Children


    This course will focus on creating and maintaining a supportive learning environment for young children. All aspects of the early childhood setting will be explored, including: physical room arrangement and use of space; learning centers, areas or stations; schedules and daily routines; appropriate guidance and discipline techniques; social-emotional aspects, climate and atmosphere. Emphasis is on meeting the physical needs of young children. Additional topics include: the importance of play; physical/motor development and developmentally appropriate activities; methods of observing and recording a child’s development; and establishing productive relationships with parents. Offered fall semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    ECE 206 - Developmental Curriculum for Young Children


    Students will gain fundamental knowledge and skills in planning developmentally appropriate curriculum and activities designed to enhance learning and foster competence in all areas of the young child. Topics include: lesson plans and theme/unit development; methods and skills which enhance children’s development; dynamics of planning and conducting group activities and group management; importance of appropriate learning materials and equipment; multi-cultural and anti-bias curriculum; communication skills; language and literacy; math, science and social studies; songs and music; and the creative arts. Offered winter semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105 . (ECE 205  is recommended.)
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
  •  

    ECE 207 - Child Development Associate (CDA) Assessment Preparation


    This course is designed to assist and support students planning to complete the National Child Development Associate (CDA) Credentialing Program. Students will examine the CDA Credentialing qualifications, process, procedures and competency statements as specified by the National Credentialing Program. The instructor/field advisor will monitor and guide students in the fulfillment of national credentialing requirements. Course meets CDA requirements for formal child care training and education in content area maintaining a commitment to professionalism. Offered winter semester only.
    NOTE: CDA candidates must have completed or be in the process of completing (within the past five years) 120 clock hours of formal child care training and education, with no fewer than 10 clock hours in each of the eight content areas outlined by the National Credentialing Program. CDA candidates must be currently working with young children in an appropriate child care setting. See ECE program lead.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  and ECE 205 ; may be taken concurrently with ECE 206 .
    3 credits = 3 lecture/on-site visitations
  
  •  

    ECE 211 - Creative Art for Young Children


    This course will give students the knowledge and tools needed to develop rich, meaningful activities that integrate art into the early childhood curriculum. This course will benefit early childhood professionals currently working with children ages one through eight, as well as those new to the field. Emphasis is on developmentally appropriate practices and designing safe, open-ended art experiences and activities. Students will explore a variety of art mediums appropriate for young children, including: drawing, collage, painting, play-dough and clay, printmaking, fiber art, sculpture, group art and art for dramatic play. Other topics include: children’s artistic development; the creative process; child-centered and child-directed activities; thematic teaching; and integrating art with language arts, music, science, math and social studies. Offered winter semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion of the CDA credential, the Michigan Department of Education paraprofessional requirements and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105 
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
  •  

    ECE 275 - Early Childhood Program Administration


    This course examines the administrator’s role in directing an early childhood program or child care center. Emphasis is on the range of administrative responsibilities related to creating, operating and maintaining a successful, high quality early childhood program/center. Topics include: budget; finances and funding; interpersonal skills; leadership styles and roles; licensing, credentialing and accreditation; marketing; organizing, planning and equipment; policy development; staffing selection, supervision and training; and parent/family involvement and education. This course is strongly recommended as an elective in the Early Childhood Education program and will benefit both future and present early childhood program administrators, directors and assistant directors. Offered fall semester only.
    NOTE: Students may clock hours of formal child care training and education toward completion or renewal of CDA Credential and child care licensing requirements for Michigan.
    Prerequisite(s): ECE 105  or permission of instructor
    3 credits = 3 lecture

Education

  
  •  

    ED 100 - Methods of Learning and Tutoring


    This course is for new and current paraprofessionals, teacher aides, trainers and prospective teachers. It is an introduction to the methods and techniques of teaching and tutoring various subjects to small groups and individuals. Students will demonstrate an ability to assist or facilitate learning for a K-12 student. Students will receive instruction enhancements using techniques in multiple intelligences, learning styles, brain-based instruction, and emotional intelligences. Other training will include approaches to instruction for the K-12 student in reading, writing and mathematics.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
  •  

    ED 101 - Introduction to a Career In Teaching


    This course is an introduction to the purposes and functions of education in American society for those planning a career in teaching or other educational service occupations. The course addresses issues such as the education of a prospective teacher, the rights and responsibilities of students and teachers, the history of education, school reform, teacher certification, financing public education and the purposes of schooling and curriculum. The course is designed to answer the student question of “why teach” and to assist students in their decision to pursue a career in education. Twenty hours of observation in K-12 settings is required. State laws may require a background check and finger-printing. Students are responsible for paying fees required for the background check.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
  •  

    ED 120 - Educational Behavior Management


    This course will explore how to connect issues in behavior management and discipline to current themes in curricular design. Issues will also include hands-on practice with techniques addressing the developmentally challenged learner. Strategies of positive and productive management to enhance learners’ behaviors will be role-played to promote meaningful learning and critical thinking. Topics will include peer mediation, “I Care” philosophy and The Theory of Constraints.
    Prerequisite(s): None; students are strongly encouraged to take PSY 210  or PSY 220  prior to this course
    3 credits = 3 lecture
  
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    ED 162 - Integrative Technology in the Classroom


    This course will give students the practical, hands-on training and experience in several areas of classroom technology including using word processing software and external equipment including image scanning, digital painting, digital photography and image projection; slide shows with software; desktop publishing software to create several fliers, newsletters and other communication materials for classroom use and parent communication; creating classroom management spreadsheets for grade books and graphic reporting; experiencing telecommunications in classroom research and lesson delivery by using the Internet, email, virtual field trips, interactive television, and other web resources.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 115  
    4 credits = 4 lecture /laboratory
  
  •  

    ED 200A - Education Observation Field Placement


    This course will serve as a description for  ED 200A , ED 200B , ED 200C  and ED 200D . This course will integrate weekly college classroom instruction with on-location learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a K-12 classroom with a certified teacher or paraprofessional and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the classroom gaining direct experience working with teachers, paraprofessionals and students. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. It is recommended that students take each credit at a different location and classroom to broaden their experience and knowledge for the credits required. Students will be required to show proof of a negative TB test (1 year or newer) prior to beginning their observation. It is recommended that students successfully complete the Michigan Basic Teacher Skills Test.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): ED 100  or ED 101  
    1 credit , plus 2 contact hours = 1 lecture , 2 laboratory
  
  •  

    ED 200B - Education Observation Field Placement


    This course will serve as a description for  ED 200A , ED 200B , ED 200C  and ED 200D . This course will integrate weekly college classroom instruction with on-location learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a K-12 classroom with a certified teacher or paraprofessional and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the classroom gaining direct experience working with teachers, paraprofessionals and students. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. It is recommended that students take each credit at a different location and classroom to broaden their experience and knowledge for the credits required. Students will be required to show proof of a negative TB test (1 year or newer) prior to beginning their observation. It is recommended that students successfully complete the Michigan Basic Teacher Skills Test.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): ED 100  or ED 101  
    1 credit , plus 2 contact hours = 1 lecture , 2 laboratory
  
  •  

    ED 200C - Education Observation Field Placement


    This course will serve as a description for  ED 200A , ED 200B , ED 200C  and ED 200D . This course will integrate weekly college classroom instruction with on-location learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a K-12 classroom with a certified teacher or paraprofessional and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the classroom gaining direct experience working with teachers, paraprofessionals and students. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. It is recommended that students take each credit at a different location and classroom to broaden their experience and knowledge for the credits required. Students will be required to show proof of a negative TB test (1 year or newer) prior to beginning their observation. It is recommended that students successfully complete the Michigan Basic Teacher Skills Test.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): ED 100  or ED 101  
    1 credit , plus 2 contact hours = 1 lecture , 2 laboratory
  
  •  

    ED 200D - Education Observation Field Placement


    This course will serve as a description for  ED 200A , ED 200B , ED 200C  and ED 200D . This course will integrate weekly college classroom instruction with on-location learning through a required 64-hour practicum experience. Students will select a K-12 classroom with a certified teacher or paraprofessional and will spend three to five hours per week over the course of the semester in the classroom gaining direct experience working with teachers, paraprofessionals and students. At the end of the semester, students will evaluate their experience and performance, as well as submitting journal entries and time sheets. It is recommended that students take each credit at a different location and classroom to broaden their experience and knowledge for the credits required. Students will be required to show proof of a negative TB test (1 year or newer) prior to beginning their observation. It is recommended that students successfully complete the Michigan Basic Teacher Skills Test.
    Prerequisite(s): None
    Corequisite(s): ED 100  or ED 101  
    1 credit , plus 2 contact hours = 1 lecture , 2 laboratory
 

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